James Hal Cone: Do we bleed for others? | Jeremy Nathan Marks
Archives / Contributors / Jeremy Nathan Marks / Politics / Pt. 10

James Hal Cone: Do we bleed for others? | Jeremy Nathan Marks

At that time, in these United States, young men like Stokely Carmichael and H. Rap Brown were coming forward from within the ranks of the student and nonviolent Civil Rights movements and saying it was time for black people to get theirs, too. If that meant a confrontation with whites in power, so be it. If that meant offending the sensibilities of politicians and good liberal allies, they would do that, too. If that meant saying that the dream of Dr. Martin Luther King was an illusion, that the United States was not a place of brotherhood; Carmichael and Brown would not hesitate to proclaim it. Continue reading

Let Us Remember Coretta Scott King & Her Children | Jeremy Nathan Marks
Archives / Contributors / Essays, Feminism, & Academia / Jeremy Nathan Marks / Politics / Pt. 10

Let Us Remember Coretta Scott King & Her Children | Jeremy Nathan Marks

It is well that we recall the challenges that Mrs. King faced in the days and weeks,
months and years following her husband’s murder. Far too often historians, journalists, and filmmakers ignore the unpaid labour of women and mothers that keeps households solvent and which enables the work of social change. Continue reading

‘Capital Beer: A Heady History Of Brewing In Washington, D.C’ By Garrett Peck » The District Nerd
A.E. Hellar / Archives / Books / Contributors / Food / Pt. 8 / Reviews

‘Capital Beer: A Heady History Of Brewing In Washington, D.C’ By Garrett Peck » The District Nerd

Overall, Peck covers the dynamic and influential history of brewing in DC from the first brewery till Prohibition. He goes in depth on Robert Portner and Christopher Heinrich, national figures, that transformed the beer industry in the U.S. by setting trends in production and introducing new technology. Continue reading

Book Review: Black Apple by Joan Crate | I’ve Read This
Anne Logan / Archives / Books / Contributors / Pt. 7 / Reviews

Book Review: Black Apple by Joan Crate | I’ve Read This

Black Apple follows a young Aboriginal girl named Sinopaki as she is forcefully taken from her family and brought to the residential school of St. Mark’s. Throughout her entire childhood and teens she is held there against her will until she is a young woman, firmly rooted in a religion she reluctantly practices but does not truly accept. Continue reading